E.L. Harvey & Sons installs solar system at recycling facility

0
71
(l to r) - Ben Harvey, executive vice president, E.L. Harvey; Jeff Constantine, vice president, operations, SolarFlair Energy; Dan Greenwood, vice president, business development, SolarFlair Energy; Steve Harvey, executive vice president,  E.L. Harvey;  , Matt Arner, president, SolarFlair Energy; Dean Polymeros, CFO, E.L. Harvey; and Doug Harvey, executive vice president, E.L. Harvey. (Photo/submitted)
(l to r) – Ben Harvey, executive vice president, E.L. Harvey; Jeff Constantine, vice president, operations, SolarFlair Energy; Dan Greenwood, vice president, business development, SolarFlair Energy; Steve Harvey, executive vice president, E.L. Harvey; , Matt Arner, president, SolarFlair Energy; Dean Polymeros, CFO, E.L. Harvey; and Doug Harvey, executive vice president, E.L. Harvey. (Photo/submitted)

Region – E.L. Harvey & Sons and SolarFlair Energy executives recently kicked-off the 1 megawatt solar installation on E.L Harvey’s 3–year-old residential recycling facility at 394 Wood St., Hopkinton.

July 7 was the beginning of a four-month project wherein SolarFlair’s project staff will install 3,124 photo voltaic panels on the 80,000 square foot standing seam roof.

“I worked with the architect in the initial design stage to make sure that this building was structurally sound enough to support an eventual solar photo voltaic system,” said Steve Harvey, executive vice president, E.L. Harvey.

Eric Stevens, SolarFlair’s system designer, explained that the panel racking will be attached with a non-penetrating clamp to insure the weatherproof and structural integrity of the roof will be maintained as it was originally designed.

The $2.5 million system is expected to generate enough electricity to cover almost 95 percent of the cost of operating the building’s state of the art waste sorting conveyor belts and cardboard baling equipment, an estimated $2 million over the next 10 years.  Beyond the energy savings, the system will displace enough greenhouse gases to take approximately 185 passenger vehicles off the road for a year.