Central Massachusetts Podiatry looks to continue growth, compassionate care in new location

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By Dakota Antelman, Managing Editor

WESTBOROUGH – Briefly slowed but not deterred by the pandemic, the team at Central Massachusetts Podiatry recently opened a new location within the Westborough Shopping Center off Lyman St. 

The practice’s four doctors are now pushing forward, looking to help patients in Westborough and beyond live comfortable, active lives free from foot pain. 

“You’ll almost never hear us say, ‘Running is not good for you’ or ‘Walking is not good for you,’” Dr. Neil Feldman said in a recent interview. “…If somebody is hurt, if somebody’s got a bad foot and they’re just trying to be active, we will dedicate ourselves to making that happen.”

Feldman and his colleagues have outfitted the new office with state-of-the-art equipment, including diagnostic ultrasound technology, several shockwave machines, and x-ray imaging capabilities.  

They’ve done this in the interest of efficiency and comfort, handling “pretty much everything” in house with minimal wait times, according to Feldman.

“It’s very, very easy to deal with us,” Feldman said. “It’s very easy to communicate with us…It’s just very easy for people.”

Central Massachusetts Podiatry has a long and respected record of work out of its Worcester office. The team had been eyeing Westborough, though, and was close to launching their new office when the pandemic hit. 

Regardless, the location is now open, and the doctors of Central Massachusetts Podiatry are excited to continue to meet and help new patients.

“We’re really excited to be in Westborough,” Feldman said. “It is a great spot.”

As the practice continues to branch out, Feldman said he recognizes the struggles and pitfalls of modern health care.

“We just treat everybody, and I think we do so in a very nice and friendly manner,” he said. “People seek us out because we care, we’re really empathetic to people’s complaints.”

“It’s hard to find doctors that have time and who have the patience to persevere with somebody who’s got a long history of problems,” he continued.  

A runner himself, Feldman works with a number of long-distance runners and triathletes. Whether a patient is trying to run a marathon, or just start jogging to stay healthy, however, Feldman said his approach is the same.  

“It’s really rewarding to get people to the starting line of a race or [to] just help people that have kind of written off even being able to exercise or be active because they’ve been told so many times that they just shouldn’t do it or can’t do it,” he said.

“Everybody’s race is different,” he continued. “A lot of times, it’s not a race. It’s just sort of ‘Do your own thing.’ Whatever that thing is, let’s make it happen.”